Ian Happ

State of the Cubs for 2018 – Part 1: A Few Position Players Are in Flux

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By Todd Johnson

When I originally came up with the idea for this post, it was in the middle of September when the Cubs had a 2 game lead over the Cardinals and a 3 game lead over the Brewers. A lot happened since it’s inception.

Looking ahead to 2018, I am most excited to see how new hitting coaches Chili Davis and Andy Haines work with these young hitters to help them adjust to both major trends and minor situations. I also look forward to personnel changes as Theo Epstein is not an executive who will sit still after how 2017 ended. He will do whatever it takes.

When I look back at the 2017 regular season, I’m going to remember a group of players that looked tired. From pitching to hitting, they appeared worn out after playing deep into October in 2015 and 2016, followed by a party that never seemed to stop from November 2 to Opening Day 2017. I think it’s just part of being a champion and the Cubs never got past it.

Now that the 2017 postseason is over, it’s time to look at the State of the Cubs for 2018. This is going be done in three parts. The first part examines the position players and the second part will analyze the current pitching staff and future needs/possibilities. The final part dissects the needs of the bullpen.

“The strength of this team for the next three to four years will be our young position players. “ – Theo Epstein…probably…

From Rizzo to Bryant to Russell to Contreras to Baez to Schwarber to Happ to Almora, it is an extremely young core that should be much improved, motivated, and rested as a result of how 2017 ended. The Cubs could trade one of them, if they needed, to help acquire another starting pitcher or even an outfielder.  That type of trade should probably be a last resort. The Cubs have plenty of prospects to deal and over $50 million in cap space to go get someone, or two, in free agency.

With Miami’s financial troubles, the Cubs could even add to their young core by using some of their assets to acquire one of Miami’s exciting young and proven outfielders (I prefer Yelich and Ozuna for defensive purposes).

There are, however, a couple of concerns for everyday players in Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward. Zobrist still has two years left on his contract while Heyward can opt out after 2018. I doubt if Heyward would unless he has a monster 2018 season. Based on the last two years, that idea does not look possible. Then again, maybe the Cubs can see if Chili Davis or Any Haines can make something happen. If Heyward was shipped out in a trade, the Cubs might have to send a substantial sum of cash to make that deal work, depending on where he goes.

As for Zobrist, I’m not sure how this is going to play out. I am of the mind that if Ben thought he couldn’t perform at a certain level, that he would retire. I think he reeks of that type of integrity, but he also might accept just a bench role which I think might be better for him. Playing two to three times a week and pinch hitting almost every day might be more productive than trying to play four or five. And I think he would succeed in being ready every day as a pinch-hitter. At some point, that transition has to be made and he has to be on board with it. Zobrist is not getting any younger.

Joe Maddon likes to carry three catchers. Victor Caratini could be one of them in 2018. Joe, however, would lean towards having veterans in those spots even if Caratini is ready. After his debut last year, though, Caratini is close to being ready. I see Caratini’s future tied to the two new starting pitchers the Cubs need for 2018 and where they come from. If it is through free agency or a trade, Caratini should begin the year in AAA. The problem is his bat might force the issue of bringing him up.

That leaves only 2 other bench players.

Tommy La Stella is one option and I don’t know if the Cubs can ask John Jay to come back. They might not be able to afford him after he proved  he can be a valuable asset to a team. The Cubs are not going to try and bring up any minor league hitting prospect at this stage either. Instead, they should go with a veteran in that role off the bench.

As I look back at the 2017 season, I think Ian Happ’s ascension messed things up in a good way. What most impressed me about Happ was the improvement he showed in the outfield. I didn’t foresee him playing centerfield at all in the majors. He looked a little rough the first month but it’s gotten better every month since. And, there still is plenty of room for growth.

In having a spectacular rookie season, probably a year early, Happ made other players expendable. The question becomes: Who do you trade? The answer is pretty simple on the surface – the one who does not have the most long-term potential to help the Cubs win a World Series. Then you can start throwing in defensive or offensive values/metrics and it becomes a mess of whether it’s Russell, Almora, Schwarber, or maybe even Happ that is used to acquire pitching.

The Cubs major-league position player portion of the roster is built for the long-haul. For now, the best option might be to fill-in with some veterans on a year-to-year basis although getting Yelich, Stanton, or Ozuna would be a coup.

Then again, The Cubs may just try to get one more year out of everyone before next year’s booming free agent crop, but I doubt it.

Ultimately, a few roster changes will coincide with the coaching changes. The changes could include just a couple of position players getting new addresses, but the results could be major.

Theo is not going to be complacent. He is not going to sit on his laurels. He is going to re-assemble another team to win it all. That’s his goal. It should be fun watching him go at it this winter.

So, as a result, be prepared for anything this offseason.

And I mean anything.

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The 7 Series – Iowa Cubs Produced Prospects in 2017 but Changes Are Coming

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By Todd Johnson

Overall Record – 67-72

For the second straight year, manager Marty Pevey had to assemble a starting rotation made out of spare parts until August. Injuries and promotions at both the major and minor league levels cut his starting rotation short. The I-Cubs did have a potent offense led by the Cubs minor league player of the year, Victor Caratini. Starting pitcher Jen-Ho Tseng put together the best half by a pitcher in AAA since Kyle Hendricks was there.

The Iowa Cubs are still producing prospects to help Chicago every year. This year we saw, in addition to Caratini and Jen-Ho, Ian Happ, Eddie Butler, Jeimer Candelario, Mark Zagunis, Dillon Maples, and several relief pitchers help out the big club in some capacity. I expect more prospects will help out again in 2018, likely they will be just in bench roles. I don’t see anyone with the everyday playing career path of Ian Happ in the upper parts of the pipeline. Caratini looks to make the 25 man roster in Chicago next spring but just as the backup catcher. I am curious as to what the plans for Mark Zagunis are as he doesn’t have much left to prove in AAA.

Here are seven things to know about the 2017 Iowa Cubs.

1. Bijan Rademacher had the quietest best second half of any prospect in the system. I was a little surprised he wasn’t named the July player of the month as he hit almost .400. He can play all three outfield positions and I think he has one of the best outfield arms after Eddy Martinez. The issue is that he doesn’t project to be anything other than a fourth outfielder. Then again, he hasn’t really been given the chance to show that he can be something else. He has begun to hit for more power and I like what he can do at the plate. He can hit for average and he knows how to work an at bat.

2. I would not be surprised to see the big league club continue to clean house again at Iowa. The 2017 roster at Iowa only had a few position players that might project to make it to Chicago. Most of the roster were journeyman players looking for one more opportunity to get back to the big leagues. With Tennessee sending anywhere between 6 and 9 position players to Iowa next year, I don’t think there are going to be too many roster spots available for any player or prospect nearing 27 years of age. Already, Jake Hannemann, Pierce Johnson, and Felix Pena have new homes for 2018. I don’t know if John Andreoli will be back again either.

3. I still believe in Chesny Young despite his up-and-down year. I think that he has some adjusting to do at this level and I’m confident that he will do well in his second go around at AAA in 2018.

4. Unless Eddie Butler can add some sort of out pitch, I don’t know if he’s going to be anything more than a fill-in at the major-league level. He had his moments this year in Chicago, but he never went much beyond five innings. He needs to be more efficient to get outs quickly and go deeper into games.

5. I am still pulling for Ryan Williams to make it. I just like the kid. He has a bulldog mentality that I love. However, after basically missing two full seasons, I wonder if returning to the bullpen might be best for his long term health. In 2018, we will see.

6. Dillon Maples is going to be close to making the Chicago Cubs 25 man roster next spring. I like the fact that he’s going to get more instruction from big league coaches that will only enhance his chances.

7. For me, the highlights of the year were the second halves of Jen-Ho Tseng (1.80 ERA) and Taylor Davis (.297 avg with 62 RBI). I am glad Davis got the call to make it to Chicago. His story is a tale of perseverance and he is an outstanding teammate and hitter that I think can play somewhere in the majors. I don’t know if Tseng will be given a true opportunity to pitch in the big leagues next year but he should get a few starts with the club in spring training. A lot of his future is tied to what the Cubs do to add starting pitching this offseason.

What to Watch for in 2018
There are going to be at least six position players from Tennessee who should start in Iowa next year. I think many will benefit from playing in the Pacific Coast League but none more than catcher Ian Rice. If you dismiss his batting average and just look at his power numbers and on base percentage, you begin to see his value and how much greater he is than his fellow prospects (17 HRs, .353 OBP). I think he is really going to benefit from playing in the hitter friendly Pacific Coast League more than any other prospect in 2018.

Jason Vosler will also benefit from playing in such environs. After a poor second half, Vosler should look to recapture what made his first half so fantastic in 2017. In the first half, he hit at a .274/.375/.521 clip with 13 HRs and 49 RBI. In addition, Yasiel Balaguert, David Bote, Trey Martin, and Charcer Burks should be starting everyday in Des Moines next summer.

Remember the name Adbert Alzolay. Out of all the prospects at Tennessee, I think he might be the most ready for Chicago. Even though he is currently a starting pitcher, I can see him coming out of the bullpen in Chicago as early as the middle of next summer. With a fastball that sits 95-97, there’s a lot to like.

A Regular Season Review by the Numbers

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By Todd Johnson

92-70 was a good enough record to earn the label National League Central Division Champions in 2017. The Cubs finished six games ahead of the Milwaukee Brewers and nine ahead of the St. Louis Cardinals. It was strange year numerically as Kyle Schwarber struggled in the leadoff spot yet wound up with 30 HRs and people fixated on Kris Bryant’s RBI from the number two spot in the lineup. Still, in spite of all the pressure to repeat a division title, the Cubs did.

The strength of their record came at home as the Cubs went 48-33. While they were 44-37 on the road, they went 4-11 on the road against the National League West. Otherwise, the road record was 40-26 against everyone else. The Cubs also struggled against the Phillies going 2-4. Against the whole National League East, the Cubs were 21-13 including 3-4 against their upcoming opponent in the NLDS. That means that they were 16-5 against the Mets, Braves, and Marlins.

Another key to the Central Division championship was the Cubs record against the Central at 46–30. The Cubs feasted against St. Louis going 15–4. The Cubs were 12-6 against the Reds, 10-9 vs Milwaukee, and they bested the Pirates 10-9 on the season.

In interleague play, the Cubs went 12-8 this year. Against right-handers, the Cubs were 71-56, and against lefties, the Cubs put up a 21–14 mark.

The Cubs struggled in the first half of the year. At the All-Star break, the Cubs were 43-45. After the break the Cubs caught fire going 49-27. That included a 13-3 record in July right after the break, 17-12 in August, and 19-9 in September.

Hitting Stats

As for individual statistics, most of the hitting stats we’re dominated by Kris Bryant. In addition to a 6.0 WAR, he also led the Cubs in weighted runs created plus at 172, weighted on base at .399, and on-base percentage with an outstanding .409 thanks in part to 95 walks. Anthony Rizzo led the team in home runs with 32 and RBIs with 109. Even though Albert Almora probably won’t qualify with enough at-bats, he did lead the team with a .298 average. John Jay, who had over 400 at bats, was next at 295. Ian Happ lead the team in isolated power at .261 and Alex Avila pleased the BABIP Gods at .388.

The thing that I was most surprised about was not that the Cubs had six guys who could hit over 20 home runs, because they’ve always had potential. Rather, I was surprised that they actually went out and did it. To have Rizzo and Schwarber hit over 30 home runs is a nice capstone to their power, but when Happ, Bryant, Baez, and Contreras crank out 20+ homers, that was quite remarkable. Where do they go from there? They are all so young.

 

My two favorite player performances this year were Javy Baez hitting .273 with 23 HRs and 75 RBI. For a second baseman, that is phenomenal production. Then there was Ian Happ who just shocked everybody a year ahead of schedule. Happ hit 24 HRs with 62 RBIs and hit .253. He did strike out over 30% of the time, but he will be even better next year. The fact that Happ just turned 23 is amazing.

Pitching Stats

As next weekend’s playoffs loom, my only concern is how the starting pitching is going to hold up. Over the last month, Hendricks and Quintana pitched well along with Lackey while Jake Arrieta struggled with an injury and Jon Lester looked tired. 

For the first half of the year, all the pitchers looked tired. I don’t think they began to look normal until after the All-Star break. Kyle Hendricks struggled with velocity early in the year and the Cubs relied on Eddie Butler for most of the first half in tandem with Mike Montgomery when free agent Brett Anderson did not work out. I liked the fact that management did not panic in their pursuit of starting pitching at that point in the year. When the deal came in for Quintana, I liked it as Jose is going to be a Cub for a while.

For the year, Lester lead the team in innings pitched with 180.2 in strikeouts with 180. Hendricks led the team in ERA at 3.03 while Quintana lead the team in FIP (3.15), xFIP (3.23), batting average against (.228), and WHIP (1.10). When it came to WAR, Lester had the best one on the staff at 2.7.

There were times this year when I didn’t think the bullpen was ever going to pull it together. However, they looked pretty good in the second half thanks in part to Carl Edwards, Jr., Wade Davis, and Brian Duensing. Edwards led the team in appearances with 73 and also had the most strikeouts out of the pen with 94 and a 1.01 WHIP. Wade Davis had the lowest bullpen ERA at 2.30 to go along with his 32 saves.

I’m interested to see how this relief corps shakes down in the playoffs and just exactly who makes the roster for the bullpen. Right now, I tend to think they are leaning towards bringing John Lackey out of the pen in the postseason while Justin Grimm could be left off the roster.

My favorite number of the year, though, is three. This will be the third season in a row that the Cubs are in the playoffs. I am starting to get used to it. Only 11 more wins to go for back-to-back titles. It’s not going to be easy – quite the contrary. It should be exciting to watch it unfold. For some reason, I don’t feel so stressed about it this year…then again, it’s not November.

 

Ian Happ’s Emergence Has Changed a Few Things

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By Todd Johnson

The biggest surprise to happen in Chicago this year was not an injury. Rather, it has been the play of Ian Happ and the reliance of the Cubs to depend on him for 105 games so far.

After the 2016 minor league season, I did not think that Happ was ready for the majors let alone AAA. In 2016 in his first full season as a pro, he was devastating at high A Myrtle Beach and was inconsistent at AA Tennessee with a horrid August as he was physically and mentally worn down. When spring training began in 2017, Ian showed renewed vigor and looked like he belonged with the major league club on a daily basis. Had it been a different era, he probably would’ve broke camp with Chicago. Instead, he was sent back to Iowa.

Happ’s situation was far different than Kris Bryant’s from a couple years ago. During Happ’s brief 1.5 year minor league career, he definitely showed that he could hit for power. I first saw him live in Beloit, Wisconsin two months after he was drafted. I came away a bit mystified at how good of an athlete he was and how beautifully his hands went through the hitting zone.

Now that he has a good body of work in the majors, I still am perplexed by how much he has changed things in Chicago. I think his ascension has been a transformational moment for him and for a few other players. I think it’s clear the Cubs love his ability to hit from both sides of the plate and to do so with power. I think the Cubs also love the fact that he he can play all three outfield positions and second base. He was even willing to take a few grounders at third a month ago just in case Bryant’s pinky was not going to heal quickly.

It’s not as if Happ has destroyed the careers of other players on the team but he has clearly jumped ahead of them on the depth chart and on the lineup card. I just didn’t see that coming this year. At the end of last year, I thought he might be ready (keyword there is might) in the middle of 2018 if all went right.

Here is who Happ’s ascension has had a direct impact on:

1. Albert Almora – After the postseason last year, the Cubs let Dexter Fowler go I thought in part to the fact that Almora was more than likely MLB ready. In the last month, Almora has tore it up against right handed pitching. Still, Happ has been the starter in most games in center. Happ has a lot to learn defensively compared to Almora’s capabilities. I don’t think the Cubs have given up on Albert. Rather, I just don’t know if they’re ready to rely on him full-time or as much as they have relied on Happ in a variety of situations. Happ’s ability to switch hit has to be a factor in Almora’s lack of playing time. 22 HRs don’t hurt either.

2. Tommy La Stella – The fact La Stella found his way to Iowa this year says more about Happ than it does about La Stella. I have always liked Tommy’s bat, but he’s not the most athletic player and Happ’s athletic ability to switch hit with power has pushed La Stella further down the Cubs bench. As a back up, La Stella has hardly gotten much playing time this year and the future doesn’t look much brighter.

3. Kyle Schwarber – I think Happ’s rise to prominence in May made it easier to send Schwarber down to Iowa a little over a month later. Had the Cubs not gotten that kind of power and production from Happ, I don’t know if they might have let Kyle work it out in the majors. Manager Joe Maddon seems to have relied more and more on Happ the past two months than he has on Schwarber. From pinch hitting to playing late in games, Happ gets the first call.

4. Mark Zagunis and Bijan Rademacher both put up outstanding years at AAA Iowa. In the second half of the year, neither got a sniff of the majors (even in September) due in large part to Happ’s performance. Going forward, I don’t even think there’s a fifth spot for a couple of years now for them or fellow outfield prospect Charcer Burks, who should be at Iowa in 2018.

5. Ben Zobrist – I don’t know how long the Cubs are going to hang onto Zobrist now. After this season, he has two years left on his deal. I can see him hanging around now more in a bench capacity as a result of Happ’s breakout season.

I think Happ’s emergence and it’s impact will be felt even more this off-season. If the Cubs make a deal to acquire more starting pitching, the Cubs will be doing so with players that I think are not seen as valuable or as essential because of Happ. Now, I’m not saying that Almora or Schwarber will be traded this offseason. I’m saying that Happ’s rise as a Cub has made the trading of other players more probable and easier to swallow.

I am looking forward to seeing Ian in the playoffs. I hope that he can respond as well as the other players listed above him did in 2015 and 2016. I think that’s going to be the ultimate test for Cub fans. For now, though, it has been a pretty impressive rookie season.

The Weekly: Debuts Galore and Some Underrated Prospects

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By Todd Johnson

What I thought would be the most exciting part of the week was the Friday night debut of Eddie Butler for Chicago. He went six innings, gave up two hits and three walks, but struck out five and did not allow a run as the Cubs beat the Cardinals 3 to 2. Butler displayed a nice collection of pitches that included a fastball with some nice arm side run. He should get one more start before the Cubs decide on whether to keep him as the fifth starter.

Then, on Saturday afternoon, Ian Happ made his MLB debut against the Cardinals. His first at-bat was not very auspicious as he struck out on four pitches. He later homered in the game – Not a bad first game. On the other hand, he will likely be back in Iowa in ten days.

We were not done yet.

Eloy Jimenez finally was scheduled to play in a game that mattered on Saturday night for Myrtle Beach. Unfortunately, the game was called because of rain. So, Myrtle Beach will play two today. I doubt if Eloy does.

Finally, Wladimir Galindo returned from the DL for South Bend. In his first at-bat, he drove in two. For the night, he went 1-4 with 3 Ks. His average is now .321.

Nice Seasons
While some prospects have made a lot of noise with their bats and arms this season, there are several other prospects who are quietly going about their business and putting together some very nice seasons.

  • Duncan Robinson has gone back and forth between starting and piggybacking. He now looks like a starter after a 7 IP, 5 K performance where he lowered his ERA down to 1.52.
  • Michael Rucker has been very hard to score on out of the bullpen for South Bend. Currently, his ERA is 1.42.
  • Bryant Flete has been a go to guy for the pelicans. He is one of the team leaders in RBIs while playing a very good shortstop.
  • Both David Bote and Charcer Burks go about their business quietly and have been essential cogs at the top of the lineup for Tennessee.
  • Matt Rose missed two weeks but it has not stopped him from being one of the team leaders in homers and RBIs for Myrtle Beach. Since returning from his injury, his average is slowly creeping up towards .250. I think he could go on a tear once the weather warms up a little bit more. Last August, he hit seven dinners in August at South Bend.

Here at Cubs Central
The Facebook page is beginning to take off with the Players of the Day segment. Every day we select the best hitter, starting pitcher, and reliever in the minors and give them some props and put their baseball card on the Internet. There is also a page on this site that keeps a record of who we selected. AND another new page on this site keeps track of each monthly All-Star team. If you are on your phone, you can click the drop-down menu in the header. If you have a computer, there should be a tab at the top of the page to select.

Around the System This Week
Iowa: 1-6; 14-20 – 8.5 GB
The Cubs can score 11 runs in a game, but then they give up 12. With Butler now in Chicago, I think there will be a mostly new rotation the second half. Alec Mills could be the only remaining starter come July.

Tennessee: 5-3; 22-14- First Place
The Smokies moved into first place in the Southern League’s Northern Division. Using a combination of excellent starting pitching, a shutdown bullpen, and some ascending hitters, the Smokies are a team to watch this year. Hopefully, they can clinch a playoff spot for the first half next month.

Image may contain: one or more people, people playing sports and baseballMyrtle Beach: 2-3; 19-16 – 2.5 GB
They have not really gone on a winning streak this year. Starting pitching doesn’t seem to be in a groove just yet. Right now, they seem to be susceptible to the big inning. Adbert Alzolay looks like he could be the real deal this year.

South Bend: 5-2; 23-12 – 1.5 GB
This team does not have a lot of power at the plate. Nevertheless, they can put up some crooked numbers in a hurry. From 1 to 9, they might have the best lineup in the system. Pitcher of Bryan Hudson also had an encouraging start this week. If Manny Rondon can get straightened out like he was last night (6IP, 0 Runs), this team could be unstoppable with some consistent starting pitching.

Extended Spring Training
There is less than a month left and some of the pitchers are starting to get stretched out a bit. Jose Albertos had a very good scoreless three inning start this week and I expect to see him hit four innings this next week.

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The Cubs MiLB April All-Star Team Is Pitching Heavy

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By Todd Johnson

You can thank the rain storms that covered much of the Midwest for me being able to finish this month’s all-star team on schedule. There were no yards to mow, no weeds to pull, and no dogs to walk in the rain. In addition, there were no minor league games except for Myrtle Beach and South Bend on Sunday.

It was a strange month for trying to pick a few spots on the All-Star team. First base was a difficult choice as most of the organization struggled at that position. I wound up going with a player who only played a few games there. When it came to starting pitching, I had a couple players drop off after poor starts in the last week. When it came time to select the hitter of the month, all I had to do was look at only one team who was rained out for the weekend.

I think the May All-Star team will be much different. For one, I think Yasiel Balaguert has started to find his stroke at first base. In the outfield, there will be much more competition as Jake Hannemann, Kevonte Mitchell, and Mark Zagunis all had strong final weeks in April. Trey Martin could return as well. I also think that some of the starting pitching will start to stabilize in Myrtle Beach and South Bend. Duncan Robinson will be one pitcher to watch in May as to whether he starts or relieves in South Bend.

So, without further adieu, here is the April All-Star team.

Team Breakdown
Iowa Cubs – 4
Tennessee Smokies – 7
Myrtle Beach Pelicans – 6
South Bend Cubs – 4

The Weekly: MiLB Pitching, EST Making News, and Some Draft Updates

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By Todd Johnson

In spite of all the turmoil, the blown saves, and the missed hitting opportunities, we wake up this morning with the Chicago Cubs in first place for the second day in a row. We also wake up today with Tommy La Stella optioned to AAA. That pretty much answers the Szczur/La Stella issue for now. As a result, I hope that people can just relax and let the games play out instead of fixating on every mistake or loss. There are still 140+ games to go.

Meanwhile in the minors…
Pitching was the name of the game this week. All across the system starting pitching dominated the headlines. Eddie Butler, Zach Hedges, Trevor Clifton, Jen-Ho Tseng, Justin Steele, Adbert Alzolay, Dylan Cease, and Manny Rondon were the feature stories from Iowa on down to South Bend. All pitched at least five innings and only gave up two runs or less. Cease did not give up a hit in his six innings while Alzolay struck out 7.

Every night it is a hard decision on what game to watch on MILB TV. I usually like to watch South Bend, especially if Cease is pitching. I also like to watch Trevor Clifton if I can at Tennessee, and Oscar de la Cruz is another pitcher I really enjoy getting a look at. However, when they all pitch at the same time, it’s a bit nerve-racking trying to watch.

Extended Spring Training News per The Cub Reporter:
In extended spring training, Eloy began playing the outfield this week. He had not made a throw into the infield as of Friday. Jake Hanneman finally returned to Tennessee just after Trey Martin was injured. In addition, Jose Albertos began throwing batting practice. Former Boise State football player Joe Martarano has gone from smashing running backs to smashing baseballs pretty easily. He has also been seeing playing the outfield, although not too well. That will take time.

Draft News
The MLB draft is just six weeks away, which I find hard to believe. I am still fascinated with David Peterson from Oregon, high school player Mark Vientos, and pitcher Brendon Little. Baseball America came out with their first mock draft through the first round. They had the Cubs selecting Missouri pitcher Tanner Houck. That would’ve been a good selection a year ago, but Houck has had a lot of issues this year. I don’t think the Cubs are going to select a descending player unless they know something everyone else does not. For the 30th pick, Baseball America had the Cubs selecting a junior college picture and they also mentioned Little. I tend to think they’re going to go with one high school bat and one college pitcher.

Around the System

Iowa: 4-3; 9-8 overall – fourth place
Ian Happ continues to hit dingers (7) but his average has started to slip below .250. It’s just how he is. He’ll go up, he’ll go down, he’ll come back up. Felix Pena is putting together a nice little resume as a reliever. I expect him to be the first to get called up when that time happens.

Tennessee: 4-1; 8-7 overall – fourth place
I really hope that Jen-Ho Tseng has recaptured the essence of who he is as a pitcher. Through three starts he has been outstanding and looks like 2014 Jen-Ho.

Myrtle Beach: 3-4; 8-9 overall – third place
Justin Steele continues to look better with every start. He is attacking the zone and looks extremely confident on the mound and in throwing any of these three pitches for strikes. Matt Rose is also starting to come around with the bat. Hopefully, he can continue hitting home runs as well as increasing his average at the plate.

South Bend: 4-2; 9-7 second place
When the bats woke up so did this team. They are 9-4 in their last 13 games. Their bullpen is nearly unhittable. I cannot wait to see how they continue to improve over the next month. The only thing this team lacks is a power bat. However, I don’t think they need it. Jhonny Pereda has really turned it on after skipping Eugene. He’s hitting .313 on the season.

Extended Spring Training
Bryan Hudson continues to shine as a starter. This week he did not allow run in a start and has struck out 12 in 11 innings the past two weeks along with getting 15 ground ball outs. Odds are that he will not make it to Eugene. Instead, he will likely fill-in at South Bend at the first opportunity. Good for him!

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